Ocean Park series by Richard Diebenkorn

I’ve been looking at this series of paintings and prints by Richard Diebenkorn (via this book, but also here.) There is something about them that keeps drawing me back. They are deceptively simple with subdued colours, apparently just variations on geometric subdivisions of a rectangle. This makes them seem akin to Mondrian, but they have much more depth to them. They clearly owe much to Klee, but also to de Kooning, at least in terms of colour values. In the end though they are themselves and stand on their own merits.

When I was at school, studying maths we were always told to ‘show your workings’ and in many ways that’s what is going on with the Ocean Park paintings. Variations, second thoughts have been painted over, but their ghosts remain.

Diebenkorn_Ocean Park 79_0

I think this is part of their appeal to me, since I’ve always been intrigued by the idea of palimpsest, even before I became an artist. Both the urban and rural landscapes of Britain can be viewed as archaeological palimpsests. Take the time to look around any British town or city you will find signs of previous activities. The street pattern in many Northern industrial towns can often be mapped against ancient field boundaries, while alignments going back into pre-history may still be seen. (http://locateit.leeds.gov.uk/CharacterOfLeeds/UrbanHistory.aspx?p=3) Beneath the streets archaeological investigation and civil engineering projects alike reveal layer after layer of activity. (http://www.crossrail.co.uk/sustainability/archaeology). The same applies in the wider landscape. Anyone familiar with Britain, will read into these paintings the pattern of fields, woods and lakes which almost define the English landscape. That landscape is almost entirely man made, even in the supposed wild areas like Dartmoor or the Scottish Highlands and has developed out of complex and cumulative processes of human intervention.

So just as imperfections and variations disturb the surface of the modern world, revealing its past to those who look, so the Ocean Park paintings reflect the process of their creation, revealing the changes made and to my mind, humanising their geometrical abstraction.

I’ll come back to this another time with images from prints inspired to a degree by Klee and Diebenkorn, and also to some new work I’m planning which will attempt to marry the geometry of this work to another interest of mine, the rock carvings and standing stones of the Neolithic era. Here’s some tasters with a couple of trail proofs.

klee lattice_000220160922_114534

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